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Face of a Miracle


Christine Hannah, 30 from New Jersey, vividly remembers her healing after receiving a word of knowledge from Pat Robertson. “My sophomore year in college, I noticed my skin was very itchy and it had spots that were rising – very small spots - and those began to connect with other spots and became huge patches.”
“I didn’t have anything to help with the symptoms which were severe itching.
“I thought I looked disgusting. The rash would itch and then weep, and dry up and be really scabby. And I just thought, ‘You look like a burn victim.’”
Christine’s mother Evelyn took note, “When I saw that it had been going on for a few months, I was very concerned. This is not only not looking good, but it’s going to cause her to not feel good about herself.”
Christine said, “I couldn’t go to the dermatologist at that time because I was a full-time college student. I was working but did not have insurance, and I was too old to be on my parents’ health insurance.” 
But Evelyn had strong faith, “I’m thinking, ‘Let’s see what God does!’ because I’ve seen Him do many miracles in my own life with my children and my husband. So I know that He can do it.”
Christine said, “I was a very regular viewer of The 700 Club.
Then she remembers Pat saying, “You may be African-American. And you’ve got this kind of dappled looking skin.”
“He prayed for a few things and when he said that, I looked up at the screen for a moment, and I said, ‘Oh, that can be anybody.’”
Pat continued, “God right now is just wiping His hand across your face and your body, and your skin is absolutely whole, in Jesus’ name.”
“After Pat prayed and gave that word of knowledge, the rashes that I already had occurring—those healed up and went away and there were no new rashes,” Christine recalls, “I had no symptoms at all for over a year. Now it’s been almost 6 or 7 years.”
Evelyn said, “Her dad and I are very thankful for what God has done in her life; even though it may be small to some people.”
Christine concludes, “I am very thankful for God healing me. There is nothing too hard for God, or too small to ask Him. No matter how small it is, He is concerned about everything that we’re concerned about and that bothers us - even our skin.”
Source: CBN.com * We appreciate sharing the news & supporting CBN. Thank you*

A True Miracle

I know God has been with me in many ways of my life even though I never learned anything about him. I was a drug addict for most of my life and finally decided I had had enough. After I stopped using drugs I had a miracle in my life. This is my miracle... Not sure if others would characterize this as a miracle but I do. In September of 2004 I found out I was pregnant, I was very excited and scared at the same time. I have had several miscarriages and was told I would have a difficult time carrying a child to full term. So that is why I was scared. Anyway on October 8th of 2004 I started bleeding and went to the hospital and they told me it was a miscarriage and it was not my fault these things happen. I was devastated. I felt like using drugs again but I knew that wasn't the answer. I prayed for GOD to help my understand why this happened to me. For several months after I still felt like I was still pregnant. Everyone told me this was normal because I am older now so it was taking longer for my body to go back to normal. I was also told that it could be because I wanted this child so badly. In February of 2005 I went back into the hospital one night because I thought I had really severe gas, my stomach was bubbling so badly, only to find out I was pregnant. They (the doctors and nurses at the hospital) of course thought I had gotten pregnant again even though I said my husband was in prison and had been there since Oct of 2004. They thought I had cheated on him and didn't believe me when I said I hadn't. When they did an ultra-sound it showed I was 28 weeks pregnant, it was 20 weeks before that when they told me I had miscarried. It was obviously the same pregnancy and they had no explanation for what happened because they had found tissue in my uterine wall which is what lead them to believe I was having a miscarriage 20 weeks before. So there was no explanation and on May 11th, 2005 I gave birth to a healthy 6pound 8ounce beautiful baby girl. She is now 14 months old and is very smart and well advanced with her vocabulary. She knows more words then a 14month old should. I am very proud of her and she is my miracle. I am still clean today and continue to go to NA meetings and out-patient substance abuse therapy. I have a wonderful support group and I am grateful today for many things! Does anyone else agree this was a miracle? I would love to hear some feedback.
God Bless Everyone!
Melissa

Source: ainglkiss.com 

1-year-old-rescued-at-sea-recovering-well-aunt-says

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The aunt of a 1-year-old girl rescued at sea by the U.S. Navy says the baby's fever is gone, and she is responding well to medication after showing salmonella-like symptoms before her family's sailboat broke down.
Sariah English told The Associated Press on Monday that her niece, Lyra Kaufman, was checked by military medical personnel after being boarded onto the USS Vandegrift on Sunday morning but her illness has not been diagnosed by a physician, yet.
English said her sister, Charlotte Kaufman, called her from the warship and told her that Lyra was bouncing back with new medication. The girl had salmonella before they left on their trip but was thought to have recovered.
The Kaufmans and their two children were rescued 900 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.
The Navy warship carrying Lyra is expected to arrive midweek in San Diego.
The USS Vandegrift was moving at 20 knots or about 23 mph, though the speeds will vary, and officials do not have an exact day yet of when the Kaufmans will arrive, where their baby is expected to get further treatment, Navy spokeswoman Lt. Lenaya Rotklein said. About 200 sailors were also on board the ship.
A statement from the parents, Charlotte and Eric Kaufman, a Coast Guard-licensed captain, said their daughter, Lyra, was doing better on the Vandergrift.
Authorities have declined to identify the girl's illness, citing privacy laws. Before the family left for the trip, Lyra had salmonella poisoning, but doctors cleared her to travel after she was healthy again, Charlotte Kaufman's sister, Sariah Kay English, said.
Four California Air National Guard members parachuted into the water and reached the boat Thursday night. The crew stabilized the girl, stayed by her side and then hopped on an inflatable boat with the family to board the USS Vandegrift on Sunday morning. Authorities decided to sink the Rebel Heart because it was taking on water.
The family took only what they could carry from the broken boat - three bags - and they were disappointed to lose the sailboat they called home.
"We understand there are those who question our decision to sail with our family, but please know that this is how our family has lived for seven years, and when we departed on this journey more than a year ago, we were then and remain today confident that we prepared as well as any sailing crew could," the San Diego couple said in a statement from the USS Vandegrift.
"The ocean is one of the greatest forces of nature, and it always has the potential to overcome those who live on or near it. We are proud of our choices and our preparation," the statement said.
Source: CBS News

An Angel Named Johnny

Old woodsmans with his rifle in the outdoors.

A mother of seven lived far from the town. Their groceries were gone, the car broken down. She knelt by her bed at the break of the day. "Oh God, be with 'Hubby' while he is away. She prayed, "God in heaven, You've promised to give to us, Your own children, provisions to live."

She rose from her knees and started her chores, lighting the stove and sweeping the floors. She tried hard to trust that the Lord would provide, but still the fear lingered--way deep down inside.

Ten miles down the road lived a woodsman named John. He walked with a limp, and one eye was gone. His hair was all matted; his clothes were a mess; and what his shack looked like, one only could guess. He trapped, fished and hunted, and he panned for some gold. His pal was a wolf dog, eleven years old.

One day he went looking for a duck or a goose, but there by the lake he saw a bull moose. He readied his rifle, took aim; then he fired. The moose gave no struggle; he fell, then expired.

The mother, meanwhile, watched her children at play. Oh, what could she give them for supper that day? She crawled down the root cellar, digging around. A few spuds and some carrots were all that she found.

As she walked to the woodshed, her heart leaped with fear. Down the road a man staggered, like he'd had too much beer. His clothes were all tattered; his face was unshaved. He must be a madman, the way he behaved.

With a loud voice he cried, "Please don't be alarmed. I'm here on a mission. I mean you no harm. "My name is Johnny, and this here's my hound."

He then swung a sack from his back to the ground. With a tooth-missing grin he said, "Brought you some meat. For me and old Lobo, it was too much to eat."

With a song in her heart and a tear in her eye, the mother said, "Thank you!" 'Twas a small whispered sigh. The children all clambered around the man then. By the time he had left, it was going on ten. As she knelt by her bed much later that day, she thanked God for sending the "wild man" their way. His appearance denied it, but she knew for sure that God sent an angel named "Johnny" to her.

A true incident from our life in the late 50’s.


Source:  skywriting.net

Puppy rescued after falling 200 feet from cliff in Northern California



Firefighters rescued a puppy that fell 200 feet off a cliff in Marin County, CBS Francisco reported.
The 7-month old pit bull named Mia landed on Rodeo Beach after Sunday's fall, getting wedged between two rocks.
Rescuers used a helicopter and rope system to reach the puppy as a crowd watched above.
At first, Mia didn't appear to be moving, and rescuers were afraid she was dead.
"The dog was kind of wedged between two rocks, and not moving at first, but then the dog moved its head, let them know she was alive," Southern Marin Fire Capt. Kai Pasquale said.
The dog was taken to a veterinarian to be checked out. It turned out she was not seriously hurt and will be home soon.
Source: CBS News

The Unsung Heroes Behind the Wounded Warriors

American Flag Pictures and wiki

When Jessica Klein married her husband, Capt. Edward Klein, a 6-foot-tall, West Point graduate, the young couple had plans for adventure, in addition to raising a family.
"We were going to climb Mount Rainier," Klein told ABC News' Diane Sawyer. "We were going to go, just do all these amazing things when he got home."
Today, though, Klein is the primary caregiver as her husband, known as "Flip," fights his way back from a massive lower-body injury that he suffered in an IED explosion in Afghanistan.
He lost his legs, an arm and the muscles that allow him to sit. And those are just the visible wounds
Former Sen. Elizabeth Dole said she witnessed the towering battle that caregivers face when she was at Walter Reed National Medical Center three years ago, caring for her husband, former war hero Sen. Bob Dole.
After speaking with the caregivers and hearing their frustrations, Elizabeth Dole said she decided it was time for the nation to help.
So she and her foundation -- The Elizabeth Dole Foundation -- commissioned a report from theRAND Corp., putting hard numbers to the caregivers to assess their needs and recommend programs that will help them.
"I do think it's a crisis, a societal crisis that requires a national response," Elizabeth Dole said.
For Jessica Klein, the struggle to care for her husband daily sometimes seems too much.
"It's funny. The people around me have much more confidence in me and my abilities than I do," said Klein, 29, of Gaithersburg, Md. "You know there's the Mother Teresa quote, 'God only gives you as much as you can handle.' Well, apparently, God thinks I'm pretty good."
She is just one of 1.1 million caregivers of soldiers from Afghanistan and Iraq who do the impossible. Though she is tiny, Klein is Flip's support both at home and when they travel.
"There have been times I've had to pick my husband up and carry him from his wheelchair to his airplane seat because his legs failed," she said. "And showering, I've had to pick him up soaking wet and try not to drop him, one foot in the tub, and try to put him in his wheelchair."
According to the Rand Corp. report released today -- "Hidden Heroes: America's Military Caregivers" -- many caregivers are trying to juggle full-time jobs with full-time caregiving. Nearly 30 percent give up their jobs altogether. Nearly a third have no health insurance for themselves and nearly 40 percent are at risk for a major depression disorder.
"But yeah, I grieve," Klein said. "He grieves. We grieve together. We grieve apart. There was a life we were supposed to have and we grieve for it. It's very difficult."
And it's not only the daily regimen of being a nurse, a therapist and a spouse -- military caregivers from all over the U.S. discussed the plight of taking on a system that can be famously bureaucratic and riddled with red tape.
Elizabeth Dole said she hopes the Rand study will be a catalyst for a nationwide effort, combining faith groups, government, businesses and nonprofits to address specific caregiver needs across the country. She is also working with legislators on Capitol Hill who will soon be introducing new legislation that will help.
"I'm trying to inspire organizations and Americans all across the country to support these hidden heroes because their story is really not known across America and these are the very people who are caring for those who cared for us," she said.
Source: ABC News

The Truth Saves NFL Player from Gang Life

Jason Avant

NFL wide receiver Jason Avant is known for his sure hands and clutch plays. In his eight seasons with the Philadelphia Eagles, he’s also emerged as a leader, a role model and someone who keeps things in perspective.
“The game of football, I love to play, but in the grand scheme of life, it’s this big,” laughed Jason.
Jason’s outlook stems from a life of adversity. As a young boy he lived with his grandmother in the projects of Southside Chicago. Most of the relatives that lived with them were gang bangers. Drug deal and drive by shootings were just a part of life.
“I understood what it was like to come into the house with $1000 dollars for making drug deals because I was selling drugs in the 6th grade.” 
Jason’s grandmother took him to church and prayed for him constantly, hoping he would find a way out.
“I was young, and I was her second chance on life,” Jason explained. “Her children didn't turn out the way she wanted them to, so her prayers for me, ‘Lord, let him be different. Lord, let his life be one that will serve You. Let him escape these streets. Let him do Your will.”
 A battle raged in Jason’s mind between God’s truth, and the reality of life.
“Because of that environment it made me bitter and callous toward God. Even though my grandmother had something that I knew I wanted, but I still couldn't see me serving Him when some people in the world could have affluence and others had the bottom of the barrel. I couldn't understand that.”
Even then, Jason says his grandmother’s words were sinking in.
Jason told reporter Tim Branson, “I tell you the truth, I was the worst gang member slash drug dealer because my grandmother gave me too much truth for me to be comfortable in that environment.  And I...”
Tim responded, “You couldn't ignore it.”
Jason said, “I couldn't ignore it.”  
In the midst of the chaos, it became clear that Jason was a gifted athlete. On the playgrounds of Chicago he decided basketball would be his ticket out. But when his grandmother moved them to a new neighborhood with a new school, he found his passion… in football.
“In one year of playing receiver I was the number one player in the state of Illinois. And it was like a dream come true.” 
Jason became an All-American, and signed with the University of Michigan. He thought college would get him away from all his grandmother’s talk about God and Jesus.
“I get to the University of Michigan and I get to room with the pastor’s son,” laughed Jason.
Tim smiled, “Wherever you go man!”
Jason agreed, “Wherever I go. Right? Listen! Here I am again with these religious, crazy people!” exclaimed Jason. 
Tim poked back, “It hadn't sunk in had it?”
Jason admitted, “It still hadn't sunk in.”
But it soon would. When Jason first came to Michigan he expected to be a star. After all, he was a top recruit. Instead he found himself on the bench. . . and stewing.
“I’m pouting on the bench. I’m so mad because I’m not playing. I’m not dressed.”
Then Jason had an epiphany.
“I’m sitting on the bench and thinking, ‘I’m being a real baby right now, and I’m missing this exciting game,’ and so the fourth quarter, I get up off my seat and I begin to cheer with the crowd and get the crowd pumped up. And we end up winning the game on a last second field goal of 56 yards and we win by one. And it was one of the greatest victories I've ever had as an athlete and it has nothing to do with the win, but it was more me dying to self. Then I made my life about others. It was one of those moments where I saw how selfish I was.”
With a new attitude Jason finished out the season and even saw some playing time. But he admits his heart was still empty. At the end of his freshman year Jason went to church where he says he heard from God.
“He began to show me all the times being in a gang neighborhood selling drugs out of my grandmother’s house, all the times my house was shot up and nobody was killed from it, how He protected me over and over again,” said Jason.  “The last thing He showed me how He gave me this talent that I didn't know I had and how He used football to bring me to this place and He began to replay all of these things over in my mind. And at the end of that it was the Spirit speaking to me. ‘After all I’ve done for you Jason, and you can’t live your life for me?’ And the Bible says, ‘it’s the goodness of the Lord that brings us to repentance.’ He was so good to me, so merciful to me, so kind to me, that May 4, 2003, I finally said, ‘yes,’ and surrendered my life to Jesus Christ.”
Afterwards, Jason went to see his grandmother.
He explained, “I was able to go there and say, ‘You know what? I thank you for showing me that Jesus is the Way, the Truth and the Light. I thank you for all your prayers. I thank you for being a good person. I thank you for helping me find the right path. And I tell you that because of you I surrendered my life to Christ.’ It was the happiest day of her life. Because she enjoyed me going to the University of Michigan but her goal in my life was that I would finally surrender. And I finally surrendered to God. And the next year she passed. It seemed like she stayed around long enough to see me come to Jesus Christ.” 
Jason went on to have a stellar career with the Wolverines.  And after college he signed with the Philadelphia Eagles, where by all accounts he was admired and respected by his team and the community.
Since our interview, Jason was released by the franchise after eight successful seasons and is now a free agent. He’s not sure where he will land, but he knows God has the answer.
“That’s what I love about God. He’s the God of the comeback. It seems like it’s always going down and it seems like it’s never going to work out. But He has the power to raise up dead things. He’s the Resurrection and the Life. I was definitely on my way down but I know Him now to be the Resurrection and the Life!”

Resource:  CBN.com